Blog

Series of consensus reference papers for MR spectroscopy

Working groups from the MRS study group of the ISMRM have been working on a series of consensus papers covering aspects of magnetic resonance spectroscopy, which, together, make a valuable reference library for anyone contemplating planning, acquiring, analyzing and publishing studies that use MRS. In 2019 a manuscript that covered recommended methods for acquiring clinical …

BIDS: From DICOM via NIfTI

Standards Standards are good. Open standards are even better as they give everyone access to the information required to build solutions without barriers. Open standards also help prevent single entities from controlling access or dominating the landscape due to proprietary knowledge or similar. Formats DICOM is a standard that has been around since the mid-80s. …

Accelerated imaging using Compressed SENSE

The Philips 3T Ingenia MRI scanner at NeuRA Imaging has a number of unique features that researchers can take advantage of for faster image acquisition. One of these featured is Compressed SENSE which can an acceleration technique that can speed up scan times by up to 50% via incomplete sampling of k-space It works by …

NeuRA Imaging Facility closed during COVID-19 pandemic

The NeuRA Imaging Facility is currently closed to all researchers and staff during the current COVID-19 pandemic.  UPDATE (July 1, 2020): NeuRA Imaging is open for limited scanning for pre-approved research studies. During this time, MRI scans acquired will still be available for researchers to access remotely for further analysis. Please email Dr Michael Green …

5 Things You May Not Know About MRI scanners

Most people have heard of MRI. Perhaps some even know what it stands for: Magnetic Resonance Imaging. And perhaps you know it is used to image the brain, the heart or other parts of the body, and to aid in the diagnosis of a disease or track the effectiveness of treatment. Many research groups at …

Constant pain changes the way your brain works, scientists find | ABC News

via the ABC: “For many people living with chronic pain the daily challenges are not only physical but emotional. New Australian research has uncovered physical changes in the brain of pain patients which might explain low mood.”